Quick Tip: More Back to School Organization with Google Forms


This is my second ‘Quick Tip’ post about using google forms for organizing back -to-school info. First, I made a post about using google forms as an easy and efficient way for parent volunteers to sign up, which you can read here. But you don’t have to stop there! You can also use google forms to recruit volunteers for classroom parties. If you have a room parent that organizes your classroom parties, with a google form (like the one below), all you have to do is hand them the spreadsheet with responses from a form like this and you are done! Click here to make a copy of this form for yourself. This link will take you to the spreadsheet of responses where you can make your own copy and change it to fit your specific needs. See the first ‘Quick Tip’ post for using google forms here if you need directions on how to do this.

Using a google form is also a really easy way to collect parent information. Caryn, from Mathtechy, commented that she will turn her google forms into QR codes that will be hanging around the room during Back to School Night, and iPads will be available if they don’t have their own devices to scan with. Great idea! In my district, all the information for parents and students is housed in Infinite Campus, but it would be worth the time to create a form where parents submit their email address into a form so that you can easily create an email list without the need for looking them up one by one. Click here for a quick tutorial on how to use a google form to create an email list in about 2 minutes. You could do the same thing for students (if they know their email addresses) to create a student email list!

I hope this helps you organize your back-to-school info!

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Quick Tip: Use Google Forms to Organize Your Parent Volunteer Sign Up


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I know it’s hard to believe, but it’s time for many of us to start getting ready to go back to school! But you don’t need to spend a lot of time and money printing papers and mailing them to parents (which may or may not make it back to you). Here is a quick technology tip for getting parent volunteers signed up easily and efficiently.  Click here to watch a tutorial for embedding a google form into your classroom website. Click here to make a copy of this form for yourself! Once you make your own copy, you can personalize it for your classroom. Here’s hoping your ‘Back to School’ rush is productive and efficient!volunteering in the classroom: Use a google form

July’s 21st Century Tool of the Month: PowToon


July’s 21st Century Tool of the Month is PowToon. This is an awesome tool that really speaks for itself when you see it in action! It is a cool animation tool that gives a very polished look without too much effort. PowToon EDU is great for upper elementary students through high school students and adults. (I had 3rd graders choose to use it this year, but not all of them were ready for it.) If you are a GAFE (Google Apps for Education) school, and your students have gmail accounts, PowToon EDU is an add-on in google drive. This makes it easy for students to create an account. Unfortunately, the free version only allows users to publish to YouTube, so if that is not an option for your school, it makes it difficult for students to share their creations.

Here are some ideas for how to use PowToon:

Introduce a lesson: the enduring understanding.

 

Advertise a workshop.

Create a cover letter for your resume. If your students participate in Ameritown, for example,  they could create a PowToon resume to apply for their jobs.

Click here to see how this 5th grader used PowToon for her spelling homework. (She does have a misspelling–oops!)

Click here to see an app smash: PowToon + Puppet Pals 2

How have you used PowToon? Let’s collaborate! Add your ideas and examples to this padlet.

 

 

Quick Tip: Thinglink and Screencastify


The 21st century tool of the month for June is google apps. This is a quick app-smashing tip about a free google app add-on from the chrome web-store called screencastify and a free program called ThingLink.

Screencastify is a web 2.0 recording tool that gives you the option of embedding a video web-cam in the bottom right hand corner as you record your screen. ThingLink is a multi-media program that you can access on the computer or the iPad. You can use a picture of any background you choose and add  a little bullseye that contains words, videos, or links to other videos anywhere on the screen.

Here are 2 quick lesson ideas for using these tools together:

If you use Daily 5 in your classroom (or any type of reader’s workshop model), then you probably have all the students in your class create goals around a reading strategy that they are focusing on such as Comprehension, Accuracy, Fluency, Extend Vocabulary. In the video above, I used the “rate graph” from the book Balanced Literacy 2nd grade (a book published by Kagan). ThingLink is the perfect program to use when graphing progress over time. Because it embeds links, video, and words, you can actually record a portion of a student reading and embed the little bullseye on the correct place on the graph. This would not only give you and the student a record of their reading rate, for example, but it would also give you and the student data of the change in his/her reading fluency over time. A video placed on the scale in the appropriate place would give the student a better understanding of what it means to be a 2 or a 3 on the rate graph. When the student has 5 points of data that have been collected over time, then he/she can use screencastify to record a self reflection on his/her change over time in the area of focus.

This self-assessment strategy would work well for all reading goals or areas of focus. The Balanced Literacy book has more graphs for different aspects of fluency such as phrasing, expression, rate and accuracy. Linda Dorn has wonderful rubrics for comprehension in her book Teaching for Deep Comprehension that I have used with students, and my favorite vocabulary rubric is Vocabulary Rubrics, Templates, & Graphs for Common Core Instruction from Hello Literacy in the TpT store.

Hello Literacy has a great activity on TpT called Describing & Inferring Details with Picture of the Day: Reading Photos “Closely”. Using this idea of practicing inferring with photos, I used ThingLink and screencastify to record my thinking. This is a great way to make thinking visual! Students could record their thinking with these tools in independently or in small groups during literacy stations.

Thinglink is a cloud-based program that creates a url, which means it can be turned into a QR code. Screencastify can be saved directly to google drive or youtube, both of which create urls as well that can be turned into a QR code. By turning teacher modeling or student thinking into a QR code, you make it visible to others as well.

Hope this quick tip was useful! Please leave a comment on how you will use these 2 programs.

June’s 21st Century Tool of the Month: Google Apps


What are google apps? They include google docs, google forms, google spreadsheets, google presentations . . . you get the idea! Any of those collaborative tools from google that you can access from google drive. You may also have heard the term GAFE (Google Apps for Kids). It’s the same thing, but geared specifically toward students. Google offers school district packages.

I think google apps are absolutely imperative to education in the 21st century. I don’t know what we ever did without it! There are A LOT of great tutorials and explanations out there. If you are brand new to using google apps and looking for a beginners guide to getting started, here are some of my favorite tutorial series:

Tutorials from Anson Alexander

Tech with Jen’s Teacher Training Bootcamp

Google apps also include add-ons from the chrome web store, and more options are being added all the time. This is a really helpful organizational tool for the ease of creating student accounts. When students are logged into their student gmail account, they can access add-ons such as powtoon, voicethread, narrable and automatically set up accounts using the credentials from their account. Trust me, you will be very grateful for that lifesaver!

One of my new favorite add-ons from the chrome web store is fetchnotes. I learned about fetchnotes from this blog post by Teaching With Technology. With fetchnotes, you can add hashtags # to organize your notes in different ways, and you can share your notes with others!

This article from Edutopia, written by Beth Holland, outlines how to apply higher level thinking skills with google docs using the add-on screencastify. It’s brillant! I tried this with 5th graders this year, and they were VERY motivated to do some higher level reflecting!

 

http://blog.techwithjen.com/search/label/Flubaroo

Here are some amazing teacher organizational add-on tools have been added to the chrome web store: flubaroo, doctopus, goobric, and common curriculum lesson planner. These tools will be huge time-savers and help you on your way to becoming a paperless classroom!

Here are some more of my favorite add-ons with links to the chrome web store:

– Class Dojo

edmodo

storybird

Boom Writer

prezi

glogsterEDU

simplebooklet EDU

powtoon EDU

voicethread

pinterest

padlet

dropbox

Vocabulary Spelling City

Khan academy 

Summer is a great time to get to know google apps, which is why it is our 21st Century tool of the month for June. I promise you will find it worth the time and effort!