Featured Book Friday: My Penguin Osbert


My Penguin Osbert by Elizabeth Cody Kimmel

Publishers Weekly

In this playful cautionary tale, a boy asks Santa for-and receives-a gift that proves more than he can handle. On Christmas morning, Joe tiptoes downstairs to find just what he wanted under the tree: a real-live penguin named Osbert. But after several very frigid days out in the snow, lots of cold-water baths and meals of creamed herring with his new penguin pal, Joe wonders if he’s made a wise choice. A follow-up letter to Santa gets a response with some thinly veiled advice in the form of two free passes to the grand opening of Antarctic World at the local zoo. Though the predictable ending wraps things up tidily, youngsters will still find much to enjoy in this lighthearted fantasy with realistic holiday roots (and the refrain will likely produce chuckles: “But I had asked for Osbert, and now I had him”). Lewis’s (Can I Have a Stegosaurus, Mom? Can I? Please!?) blend of watercolor, pastel and some digital rendering creates an appropriately dreamy-looking backdrop for Joe’s adventure. A cool blue-white palette is often tempered with the glow and shadow generated by inviting indoor lighting. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Curriculum Connections: by guest author Marika Gillis
Check out Marika’s blog: Read to Me (click here)

Sequencing Lesson Plan

Objective:  The student will sequence the events in a story. (Knowledge)

DOL: The students will read a story and put the events from the story in order using a graphic organizer.

Anticipatory Set– Tangled: Horsing Around Video

1.    Start by having students try to order the events from the movie without watching it.

2.     Then students will watch the movie clip and order the events that occurred in it on the graphic organizer.

(http://www.wingclips.com/movie-clips/tangled/horsing-around)

3.    Ask students:  Why was it hard to put the events in order the first time?

What made it easier after watching the video?

Direct Instruction

1. Pass out paper with tips for finding the sequence of events in a story:

-thinking about beginning, middle, and end

-looking for signal words & phrases (i.e. next, finally, before, after)

-think about other clues in the text like times of the day,

days of the week, and dates

2. Explain to students why it is important to understand the events in a story.

3. Read aloud the book My Penguin Osbert by Elizabeth Cody Kimmel

(During the reading, students will need a copy of the phrases that are clues to the sequence of the story.  They will circle the phrases as they hear them throughout the story.  This is to draw attention to the clues in the text that show the sequence of events and keep students engaged during the story reading.)

-while reading, students circle the phrases that are clues to the sequence of the story as they hear them (model the first pages)

-model using the above strategies to put the events from the story into the graphic organizer  (explain thinking!)

Guided Practice

1. Give students a story in pieces and have them use the signal words and other clues to put the events from the story in order, using the same graphic organizer

2. Ask:  What words/phrases helped you decide what order the

paragraphs belonged in?

What would have made this easier?  (reading the whole story first)

Independent Work

Demonstration Of Learning (DOL)- Students work independently to put events from a story into the same graphic organizer


Events from the movie Tangled   (copy and cut apart before lesson):

The bag of jewels flings out of reach and lands on a tree branch.

The tree trunk breaks.

The thief is chased by palace guards.
The thief jumps and lands on the guard’s horse.

The thief quickly climbs the tree, reaching for the bag.

 

 

It is important to know the order or sequence that events take place in a story. It helps you understand what you read.

To figure out the sequence or order of a story…

1- Think about what happens at the beginning of the story, in the middle of the story, and at the end of the story.

2- Look for signal words like first, next, last, before, after and finally to help you figure out the sequence.

3- Think about the other clues in the text that indicate the passage of time- time of the day, days of the week, ages, and dates.

after a while                  last year

the next day

next Saturday                        by daybreak

after breakfast


My Penguin Osbert

last year

so this year

when Christmas morning came

that night

after a while

the next morning

after breakfast

that afternoon

a couple of days later

next Saturday

My Penguin Osbert

last year

so this year

when Christmas morning came

that night

after a while

the next morning

after breakfast

that afternoon

a couple of days later

next Saturday

My Penguin Osbert

last year

so this year

when Christmas morning came

that night

after a while

the next morning

after breakfast

that afternoon

a couple of days later

next Saturday

 

My Penguin Osbert

last year

so this year

when Christmas morning came

that night

after a while

the next morning

after breakfast

that afternoon

a couple of days later

next Saturday

Name_______________________

Date________________________

Sequencing DOL

Directions:  Read the passages below.  Then put the events in the correct order.

Wilma Rudolph was born in Tennessee in 1940.  As a young child, Wilma was sick with polio.  Her left leg was so weakened by the sickness that doctors told her she would never walk.  Wilma exercised her leg as hard as she could.  By the time she got to high school, she was able to join the basketball team.  Later, Wilma won several Olympic gold medals for running.  Wilma became one of the fastest women of all time.

The Nile crocodile lays her eggs in the warm sand or mud far away from the river.  Then she listens for the sounds of the young crocodiles inside their shells.  Next, she uncovers the eggs and waits for the young to hatch.  Finally, she carries the newly hatched crocodiles in her mouth to the river, where they learn to swim.

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One thought on “Featured Book Friday: My Penguin Osbert

  1. I love your lesson Marika, and I can’t wait to use it in my classroom! I haven’t read this book before, but I will definitely be checking it out from the library! It looks really cute. It makes me think of Mr. Popper’s Penguins. I didn’t know about wingclips, and I’m looking forward to checking that out for more ideas too!

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